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Dana M. Olwan

Dana M. Olwan


Assistant Professor,
Women's & Gender Studies

dmolwan@syr.edu

311 Sims Hall
315.443.3707


About

On leave at the Doha Institute for Graduate Studies till Fall 2018

Dana’s research is located at the nexus of feminist theorizations of gendered and sexual violence, solidarities across geopolitical and racial differences, and feminist pedagogies. In support of her work, she has received a Future Minority Studies postdoctoral fellowship, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Art/Research Grant, and a Palestinian American Research Council grant.  Her writings have appeared in the Journal of Settler Colonial Studies, the Canadian Journal of Sociology, Feral Feminisms, Atlantis: Critical Studies in Gender, Culture and Social Justice, American Quarterly, and Feminist Formations. She is co-editor with Margaret Pappano of Muslim Mothering: Local and Global Histories, Theories, and Practices (Demeter Press 2016). Shorter opinion pieces can be found on Rabble, Ricochet, The Feminist Wire and Al Jazeera. 

Research and Teaching Interests

Areas of research include gendered and sexual violence and the “honor crime,” comparative settler colonialisms, feminist pedagogies, and representations of Arab and Muslim women. Her teaching interests include transnational feminist theories of race, gender and religion, gender politics and feminist movements in the Middle East, and indigenous and feminist solidarities. 

Courses

WGS 101 Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies

WGS 201 Transnational Feminist Studies

WGS 301 Feminist Theory

WGS 310 Feminist Inquiries

WGS 400/600 Gender, Sexuality, and Islam

WGS 400/600 Global Perspectives, Local Contexts: Women and Gender in the Arab World (Summer Study Abroad Course; co-taught with Dr. Carol Fadda)

WGS 791 Practices of Transnational Feminism

WGS 453 Feminisms, Sexualities, and Human Rights in Middle Eastern Societies 

Projects

Together with Professor Dorit Naaman from Queen’s University, Dana is engaged in an international and multiplatform digital project that studies a genealogy of a West Jerusalem neighborhood called Katamon. Traces of the complex histories of Katamon can be found throughout the city but are repeatedly made invisible through past and ongoing histories of occupation, gentrification, and resettlement. By engaging former Palestinian residents, the project uses digital technologies and memory collection platforms to enunciate the complex histories of this neighborhood. Katamon in Color is funded by a grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.