Michael L. Kalish

Professor, Psychology


Education

Ph.D., Cognitive Science, University of California at San Diego, 1993.

M.S., Cognitive Science, University of California at San Diego, 1991.

B.Sc., Cognitive and Linguistic Science, with Honors, Brown University, 1987.




Research Interests


My research involves describing the cognitive mechanisms responsible for the nature of human learning and memory, with a particular focus on categorization and dimensional attention.  I am interested in ‘solving’ Plato’s (other) problem: “... to be able to cut up each kind … along its natural joints, and to try not to splinter any part, as a bad butcher might do.”  In the context of the cognitive science of learning and memory, this equates to finding a way to count the number, and a way to characterize the nature, of the cognitive systems responsible for performance over a range of related tasks and measures.  To meet this challenge I use empirical studies, computational models, and advanced statistical techniques.




Academic Appointments

- Professor, Department of Psychology, Syracuse University, 2013 – present.

- Associate Professor, Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Louisiana, Lafayette. 2005 – 2013.

- Assistant Professor, Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Louisiana, Lafayette. 2002 – 2005.

- Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of Western Australia. 2002.

- Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of Western Australia. 1995 – 2002. Tenured, 2000.

- Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Mathematical Psychology, Department of Psychology, Indiana University, Bloomington. 1993 – 1995.




Recent Publications

Kalish, M. (2013). Learning and extrapolating a periodic function. Memory & Cognition, 41, 886-96.


Griffiths, T. L., Lewandowsky, S., & Kalish, M. L. (2013). The effects of cultural transmission are modulated by the amount of information transmitted. Cognitive Science, 37, 953-67.


Kalish, M. & Dunn, J. (2012). What can cognitive neuroscience tell us about recognition memory? Australian Journal of Psychology, 64, 29-36.


Dunn, J., Newell, B. & Kalish, M. (2012). The effect of feedback delay and feedback type on perceptual category learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 38, 840-859.


Lewandowsky, S., Yang, L., Newell, B. & Kalish, M. (2012). Working memory does not dissociate between different perceptual categorization tasks. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 38, 881-904.


Kwantes, P., Neal, A. & Kalish, M. (2012). Item order matters in a function learning task. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, 66, 90-97.


Trigg, J. & Kalish, M. (2011). Explaining how the mind works: on the relation between cognitive science and philosophy. Topics in Cognitive Science, 3, 399-424.