Matthew LaHaye

Associate Professor of Physics


Research Interests

  • Quantum effects in macroscopic systems.
  • Fundamental limits of measurement.
  • The physics and applications of Nanoelectromechanical Systems (NEMS).




Education

2005 Ph.D. in Experimental Condensed Matter Physics
University of Maryland, College Park
1999 B.S. in Physics and Philosophy
University at Albany




Awards & Professional Honors

  • NSF CAREER Award (Began May 2011)
  • Center for Physics of Information Postdoctoral Scholarship, Caltech (2005-2007)
  • Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society Member (Inducted Nov. 1997)




Selected Publications

Hao, Y., Rouxinol, F, & LaHaye, M.D. Development of a Broadband Reflective T-filter for Voltage Biasing High-Q Superconducting Microwave Cavities. Applied Physics Letters 105, 222603 (2014).

Suh, J., LaHaye, M.D., Echternach, P.M., Schwab, K.C. & Roukes, M.L. Parametric Amplification and Back-Action Noise Squeezing by a Qubit-Coupled Nanomechanical Resonator. Nano Letters 10, 3990-3994 (2010).

LaHaye, M.D., Suh, J. Echternach, P.M., Schwab, K.C., & Roukes, M.L. Nanomechanical Measurements of a Superconducting Qubit. Nature 459, 960-964 (2009).

Naik, A., Buu, O., LaHaye, M.D., Armour, A.D., Clerk, A.A., Blencowe, M.P. & Schwab, K.C. Cooling a Nanomechanical Resonator With Quantum Back-action. Nature 443, 193-196 (2006).

LaHaye, M.D., Buu, O., Camarota, B. & Schwab, K.C. Approaching the Quantum Limit of a Nanomechanical Resonator. Science 304, 74-77 (2004).




Research Spotlight

Research in the LaHaye group focuses on the development of new technology to explore quantum mechanical behavior in the motion of engineered systems.  While quantum mechanics was initially developed to account for the physical behavior of systems at the atomic scale, experiments over the past century have shown it to be applicable to a larger and larger domain of systems, stretching from the constituents of atomic nuclei to superconducting circuits and microwave cavities. In fact, in just the past several years, researchers have begun to observe signatures of the quantum realm in the motion of nano- and micro-fabricated structures that have been carefully engineered and measured under very stringent conditions (i.e. at temperatures of only a few hundredths of a degree above absolute zero). While these quantum electromechanical systems are microscopic in size, they still consist of billions of atoms and thus represent the largest systems to date for which quantum signatures of motion have been observed.

Lab website: lahayelab.syr.edu