Brempong Osei-Tutu

Instructor-Adjunct of African American Studies


Research and Teaching Interests

Material Culture, Memory, Atlantic Africa and the African Diaspora




Education

PH.D.  Anthropology, Syracuse University, Syracuse, 2009.
M.PHIL.  Archaeology, University of Ghana, Legon, 1987.
B.A. (Honors) Archaeology and Geography, University of Ghana, Legon, 1981.




Selected Publications

  • With Alex B. Asiedu abd Kwame Amoah Labi. An Asantemen-World Bank Heritage Development Initiative in Promoting Partnership with Ghanaian Traditional Leaders. Africa Today 55, 4: 3-26. 2009
  • Transformations and Disjunctures in the homeland: African American Experiences in Ghana. In the Transatlantic Slave Trade: Landmarks, Legacies, Expectations, Edited by james K. Anquandah, pages 326-342. Sub-Saharan Publishers, Accra 2007
  • Ghana's "Slave Castles," Tourism, and the Social Memory of the Atlantic Slave Trade. In Archaeology of Atlantic Africa and the African Diaspora, edited by Toyin Falola and Akin Ogundiran, pages 185-195. Indiana University Press, Bloomington and Indianapolis. 2007
  • Contested Monuments: African Americans and the Commoditisation of Ghana's "Slave Castles." In African Re-genesis: Confronting Social Issues in the African Diaspora, edited by Jay Haviser and Kevin MacDonald, Pages 9-19. Unversity College Press, London  2006
  • Frontier Archaeology of the Akuapem Ridge and the Eastern Accra Plains. In Accra Before Colonial Times: Proceedings ofa Colloquium on Early Accra. Institute of African Studies Research Review Supplement 17: 91-106. 2006
  • Mound Makers and Brass Casters from the Akuapem Ridge, Eastern Ghana: Question of Identity in the Archaeological Record. Journal des Africanistes, 75-2: 54-63 2005
  • African American Reactions to the Restoration of Ghana's "Slave Castles." Public Archaeology 3: 195-204. 2004
  • "Slave Castles" and the Transatlantic Slave Trade: Ghanaian And African American Perspectives." Ghana Studies 2004, 7 59-78.Contested Monuments: Research in Ghana. West African Research Association Newsletter, Fall 2003: 16-17